Entries by Beverly Engel

Disrupted sleep in one’s 50s, 60s raises risk of Alzheimer’s disease

PET brain scans of healthy older adults show that those reporting lower sleep quality through their 50s and 60s have higher levels of tau protein, a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Previous studies link poor sleep to beta-amyloid tangles also, suggesting that protein tangles in the brain may cause some of the memory problems of AD and dementia. In addition, out-of-sync brain waves during sleep are associated with tau, providing a possible biomarker of dementia.

Risk Reduction of Cognitive Decline and Dementia WHO Guidelines

  Dementia is a rapidly growing global public health problem. Worldwide, around 50 million people have dementia, with approximately 60% living in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Every year, there are nearly 10 million new cases. The total number of people with dementia will reach 82 million in 2030 and 152 million in 2050. Dementia […]

A Handful of Bean-Inspired Recipes

High in fiber and antioxidants, beans are good for the heart and, therefore, good for the brain. Packed with high-protein, beans certainly provide a healthy low-fat option to meat. While beans may not be the most admired vegetable, they certainly pack a punch when it comes to being nutritious and versatile. Below are four bean-inspired recipes. […]

Brain science to improve your relationships

On the surface, your own brain may be your furthest consideration when you are trying to improve your relationships. Yet it is the very place that processes where you perceive, understand, remember, evaluate, desire, and respond to people. The somewhat bizarre fact of life is that the people who are in our lives are not […]

Youth tackle football will be considered unthinkable 50 years from now I would know — I’m a CTE expert and former college football player.

Chris Nowinski, the featured speaker at Brain Up’s BrainFest knows first-hand about the dangers of concussions and CTE. This football player and professional wrestler was forced to retire his athletic career because of repetitive concussions. He earned his Ph.D. in Behavioral Neuroscience at Boston University School of Medicine and is co-founder and CEO of the Concussion Legacy Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to solving the sports concussion crisis through education, policy, and research.